Tomorrow I Am Going To Do Something About My Cholesterol

If you’ve said that you’re like many other Americans who share a concern about the risk of coronary heart disease. But if you’ve never quite gotten around to doing something about it, keep reading. You’ll find answer to some of the most common questions that people have about cholesterol, and what you can do to control it. Happily, you’ll find that taking control of cholesterol is a lot easier and better tasting than you thought!

Why is cholesterol suddenly such a big deal?

If you’ve noticed that cholesterol has received increased attention over the past few decades, you’re right. In 1985, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health launched the national Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). The program’s goal is the reduction of illness and death from coronary heart disease (CHD) by reducing the number of Americans with high blood cholesterol. The impetus behind the NCEP was smoking-gun evidence that lowering high blood cholesterol reduces the risk of coronary heart disease. As a matter of fact, a one-percent decrease in cholesterol yields a two-percent decrease in the chance of a heart attack!

Surveys also indicated that neither physicians nor the general public were adequately informed about the relationship between cholesterol and CHD. This led to an aggressive strategy of public and professional education. So yes, you have been hearing more about cholesterol, because there’s a lot more to hear.

What is coronary heart disease?

Over time, cholesterol as well as other blood born substances deposits themselves on the interior walls of the coronary arteries. When this build-up restricts the flow of blood through the arteries, too little oxygen reaches the heart. At best, CHD victims suffer chest pain (angina); at worst, a deadly heart attack – the kind that accounts for 30 percent of nearly two million deaths in the United States each year.

While elevated levels of blood cholesterol seriously increase a person’s risk of CHD, tacking on smoking and high blood pressure, the other main risk factors, multiplies that risk.

How many Americans have high cholesterol?

The American Medical Association published these figures based on NCEP estimates: Thirty-six percent of Americans have cholesterol levels that are high enough to warrant being under the care of a physician. About 102 million Americans ages 20 years and older are candidates for medical advice and intervention for high levels of blood cholesterol.

On top of that, there are millions more who should take immediate steps to bring their blood cholesterol levels into the “desirable” range.

In other words, if your cholesterol level could stand some tinkering, you’ve got something in common with better than one-out-of-every-two Americans!

What role does age play?

If you are between the ages of 20 and 39, the likelihood is one-in-five that your cholesterol level is too high. That rate jumps to one-in-two between the ages of 40 and 59. Over the age of 60, there’s a 60-percent chance that you have a problem.

Should you be screened for high cholesterol?

If you’re over the age of 20 you should! The NCEP suggests that you have the test done at least once every five years.

Your initial evaluation will determine your total cholesterol level and assess risk factors such as cigarette smoking, blood pressure and your personal as well as family health history. Often, cholesterol screening is carried out during the course of a routine physical examination, but advances in finger-stick testing procedures (where the finger is pricked in order to draw a minute quantity of blood) make widespread initial screening in non-clinical settings a practical and convenient alternative. Borderline-high or high levels of blood cholesterol found using the finger-stick method should be confirmed by your family physician.

The important thing is that you know your cholesterol level. Blood cholesterol is measured in milligrams per decilitre (mg/dl). Levels below 200 mg/dl are classified as “desirable blood cholesterol,” those between 200 and 239 mg/dl are “borderline-high blood cholesterol” and above 240 mg/dl are “high blood cholesterol.” At 200 and above, the risk of CHD steadily increases.

In general, the NCEP recommends that persons with blood cholesterol levels between 200 and 239 mg/dl adopt heart-healthy dietary habits and be retested annually. If additional risk factors are present, further testing will likely be required.

Persons with blood cholesterol levels above 240 mg/dl should have additional testing to determine a course of treatment in order to lower their blood cholesterol level.

Should children be screened?

The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition believes that children with family histories of either early CHD or high cholesterol should be evaluated. “Early” means prior to the age of 50 in men and 60 in women.

For a variety of reasons, the Academy doesn’t believe in universal testing for children, but its view isn’t shared by all. Cory Servaas, MD, Director of the Children’s Better Health Institute, says that between 20 and 30 percent of the children under the age of 12 that her organization tests “have cholesterol levels higher than we think they should be… 180 mg/dl.” And she adds: “Since the screen test is inexpensive and easy to do, why not do it? Often we don’t know what the family history is in order to know whether a child should be tested.”

Is there really ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol?

Absolutely! But first, it’s important to understand that everyone, regardless of age, needs cholesterol. It’s vital for the formation of cell membranes and for the manufacture of bile acids. It’s also the chemical precursor of hormones such as progesterone, testosterone and estrogen. All cells in the body can manufacture cholesterol – 80 percent is produced by the liver – and there is no known physiological reason to supplement the body’s own cholesterol with dietary cholesterol.

In order for cholesterol to get from where it is manufactured – in the liver, for example – to where it is needed to support metabolism, it is transported as a lipoprotein. (Lipoprotein are substances that allow insoluble fats like cholesterol to travel around in water-based blood.) Low density lipoproteins (LDLs) carry cholesterol outbound from where it is manufactured, while high density lipoproteins (HDLs) transport it to the liver. At this point, the cholesterol can either be metabolized further, or passed into the intestine for elimination. Because HDLs limit the amount of cholesterol in the blood, they provide protection against dangerously high cholesterol levels. High levels of HDLs have been associated with a lower incidence of CHD.

If your cholesterol tests in the “high” range, or if you are “borderline-high” with additional CHD risk factors, your physician will do additional tests to establish the relationship of LDLs to HDLs.

What can you do to maintain a heart-healthy diet?

You don’t have to be a professional dietitian, or eat a boring diet in order to reduce or maintain a desirable cholesterol level. You also don’t have to carry a calculator around in order to add up milligrams of this or that. What you do need to know are some basic principles.

  • Eat less fat! There are three types of fat: saturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated. A heart-healthy diet requires that you reduce your consumption of saturated fats.

They’re found in meat and dairy products, as well as in commercially prepared baked goods made with coconut oil, and cocoa fat. Read the labels!

Instead of eating foods high in saturated fats, shift your emphasis toward complex carbohydrates (whole grains, fruits and vegetables), seafood and poultry sans skin. If you do eat meats select lean cuts and remove as much of the fat as possible before cooking. By cutting back on fat, you’ll also dramatically reduce calories, since fat contains twice as many calories as protein or carbohydrates.

  • Substitute polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats for those that are saturated. Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats can actually help you to reduce your cholesterol. And recent studies conducted at the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, indicate that monounsaturated fats lower LDL (bad cholesterol) levels while leaving HDL (good cholesterol) levels intact. Canola oil is a wonderful source of monounsaturated fat. It’s one of the principal cooking oils in Japan, a country widely regarded for its low rate of heart disease.
  • Reduce dietary cholesterol. Avoid organ meats altogether and eat fewer egg yolks.
  • Increase dietary fibre. Never before has fibre been easier to introduce into your diet. Lately we’ve been hearing a great deal about oat bran as a source of fibre, and for good reason. Studies indicate that oat bran, when eaten regularly, can reduce cholesterol by up to 19%.
  • Exercise! Exercise has shown to reduce the risk of CHD by increasing level of good cholesterol HDLs in the blood.
  • Stop Smoking! Exercise raises HDL levels, but smoking reduces them. Smokers run an added risk of CHD.

Do school lunch programs support heart-healthy dietary standards?

Jayne Newmark, national spokesperson for the American Dietary Association, cautions that school lunch programs are self-supporting, and therefore, sell foods that kids are most apt to buy. “Our job is to get kids to like foods that are heart-healthy. Today, you see a lot of hamburgers and French fries because that’s what kids like. We have a selling job to do. That’s why we’re trying to get nutrition into the curriculum. But education really starts at home and it can’t begin too soon,” says Newmark.

What are the additional benefits of a heart-healthy diet?

A high-fat and low-fibre diet has been linked to cancers of the colon and breast, as well as to diverticular disease, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure and even osteoporosis. And if that isn’t enough, there’s always obesity to appeal to the vanity in us all.

Know the Details About a Cocaine Heart Attack and All Related Things

Cardiac arrest is the most popular name for a disruption of the regular availability of blood flowing to any given portion of the heart muscle; physicians and scientists refer to the condition more formally as a myocardial infarction. Without its required availability of oxygen-bearing blood, the heart muscular will die off easily, producing a situation that can cause serious heart damage or rapid death. Those who use cocaine build a variety of issues in their regular cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) health that contributes greatly to their heart attack risks. These issues occur in the aftermath of both short- and long-term cocaine use and affect even casual customers of the drug.

Cocaine is a hunger controller and powerful stimulant drug that comes from the coca plant, from which it derives its name. It is used for a variety of instantaneous results that it makes, including delusions of supremacy, euphoria, improved energy, and performance. As these results wear off, uneasiness, pressure, and paranoia can set in, as well as higher body temperatures, an elevated pulse rate and blood pressure levels, and difficulty breathing. The increase in blood pressure levels alone can cause cardiac arrest in some cases; however, it can also cause unequal heart beat, the issue known as arrhythmia, which can also be deadly. Long-term usage of cocaine can not only cause to habit but also dehydration and a dry mouth, which can cause to damage being done to the teeth. Kidney failure, autoimmune illnesses like lupus, and heart attacks are other risks that come with the prolonged use of cocaine. Cocaine is especially damaging to the heart because it carries with it the possibility of occasional small heart attacks, plus it interferes with cocaine such as try out blockers that physicians use to treat heart attacks.

Cocaine’s Effects on the Heart

Cocaine use triggers a significant boost in the body’s availability of a chemical known as norepinephrine, which acts as a neurotransmitter and boosts the frequency of certain types of communication between nerve cells known as nerves. Specifically, norepinephrine generates improving levels of activity in the nerves of a process known as the supportive neurological system, which divisions throughout the body and helps provide unconscious control of the heart muscle and blood vessels, as well as a variety of additional vital organs. When cocaine enters the bloodstream, activation of the supportive neurological system generates heart-related changes in regular body function including blood pressure increases, heartbeat acceleration, and an improve in the amount of blood pumped by the heart in any given minute.

Signs of Cocaine Abuse

· Cocaine is a highly addictive substance. What starts off as seemingly harmless experimentation can easily become a potentially life-threatening habit.

· By recognising the symptoms of cocaine misuse, you can get your loved one the help they need before a habit takes hold.

· According to the scientists, cocaine may damage in stomach area, difficulty breathing, pressure, palpitations, dizziness, nausea and heavy sweating and unless a doctor knows what they are dealing with, the standard therapy for heart attacks such as beta-blockers and clot-busting cocaine, could be given with tragic results if the individual has been using cocaine.

· Cocaine improves blood pressure levels which in turn can improve the possibility of bleeding into the brain if the individual is given clot-busting drugs; beta-blockers can cause greater blood pressure levels and constricted arteries in individuals who have used cocaine.

· Experts say in a portion of customer’s cocaine can actually cause cardiac arrest.

· Cocaine-related chest pain in stomach area usually occurs within three-times of using the cocaine, but the cocaine can stay in the body for at least 18 times and proceed to cause issues.

· The new guidelines say cocaine customers with chest pain in stomach area should be monitored in an observation unit for nine to 12 hours.

While only about 1 % to 6 % of patients with cocaine-associated chest pain actually have a cardiac arrest, physicians maintain it is important for anyone with chest pain in stomach area to get checked out.

Cocaine Abuse Treatment and House Remedies

· First and foremost, the cocaine abuser must quit using the cocaine and other cocaine that accompany its use. Not many problems of cocaine use may perhaps be treatable at your home. The most frequent problems are psychiatric in nature.

· Anxiety, light agitation, hunger loss, insomnia, irritability, light panic disorder, light depression, and light headaches could probably be handled at your home by avoiding the use of the cocaine and observing the user.

· Runny noses, nose blockage, and brief nosebleeds can be also be cared for you at your home by avoiding the cocaine, helping the humidity of the air breathed in with hookahs and humidifiers, and direct nose pressure for 10 minutes to end the nosebleed. Implement a topical antibiotic such as bacitracin or petroleum jelly to help with the drying and crusting. Avoid nose picking.

· The chronic coughing chest pain of black non-bloody phlegm may perhaps be treatable again by cessation of cocaine smoking and other cocaine such as cigarettes or marijuana. Over-the-counter coughing medicines containing the ingredient guaifenesin, the active compound in Robitussin, plus improved water drinking may help.

· IV cocaine customers who proceed to use cocaine may lower their exposure to communicable illnesses and disease by not reusing or sharing needles. Cleansing the skin properly prior to the injection also decreases the possibility of disease.

How to Avoid Cocaine Abuse

Prevention should start early in the preadolescent years for all kids but particularly for those who are in danger. This consists of kids in families with a history of any addiction such as alcohol addiction and cocaine misuse. However simplistic the concept, teaching youngsters to say “no” to using cigarettes, liquor, and cocaine is an excellent protection tool. If we can keep your kids and our generations to come from the gateway drugs of nicotine, liquor, and marijuana, then we may be able to avoid the escalation to harder drugs such as cocaine and other

People between the ages of 18 and 45 are particularly susceptible to a cocaine-induced heart attack, according to a study published in 2007 in the journal “Clinical Medicine & Research.” These hazards connect with all cocaine customers in this age group, whether or not they have a previous record of heart- or blood vessel-related health issues.

What You Need to Know About Heart Diseases and Stroke

Introduction.

Heart disease is a name given to a variety of conditions that affect the performance of the heart. There are certain disturbances in the action of the heart without any disease in the organ. Most common of these is palpitation. This may be due to emotional states, such as fear, anger, joy, grief, or anxiety; or to certain drugs or poisons such as may be found in tea, coffee, tobacco, or alcoholic drinks.

As heart failure approaches, the real symptoms of the heart disease appear. Shortness of breath on slight exertion is one of the first symptoms. Distress and fullness after eating are very common. Other early symptoms are weakness and lack of endurance, in the legs particularly; palpitation of the heart with fullness in the chest and a dry cough; dull pain and soreness in the region of the liver and also over the heart. Swelling of the ankles may be one of the first symptoms noticed. It is usually worse in the evening and disappears during sleep. Weakness increases until the patient finds himself utterly exhausted on the slightest exertion. He is restless and sleepless.

Every person with acute heart disease of any variety should be under the daily care of a physician and everyone with chronic heart disease should be seen frequently by a physician. A common misconception about the heart is that once it is affected, there is the permanent difficulty, with chronic invalidism and early death. Nothing is further from the truth. The rugged heart often makes an excellent recovery in the course of time. Rest, both physical and mental, is a valuable remedy. The patient must choose food that will not cause gas and indigestion, and guard against emotional outbursts, especially anger.

1. Types of Heart Diseases.

Important examples of heart disease include:

i. Angina, in which there is poor blood circulation to the heart.

ii. Heart Attack, in which there is the death of part of the heart muscle.

iii. Arrhythmia, in which the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat is abnormal.

iv. Atherosclerosis, in which the arteries harden. It is a build-up of cholesterol and other fat substances within the walls of the arteries. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease and can develop in any artery in the body. It is a common disorder of the arteries.

v. Rheumatic, this was formerly one of the most serious forms of heart disease of childhood and adolescence. This disease involves damage to the entire heart and its membranes. It is a complication of rheumatic fever and usually occurs after attacks of rheumatic fever. The incidence of this condition has been greatly reduced by widespread use of antibiotics effective against the streptococcal bacterium that causes rheumatic fever.

vi. Myocarditis, it’s the inflammation or degeneration of the heart muscle. This can be due to a complication during or after various viral, bacterial or parasitic infectious diseases, such as polio, influenza, rubella, or rheumatic fever. This can be caused by several diseases such as syphilis, goitre, endocarditis, or hypertension. It may be associated with dilation (enlargement due to the weakness of the heart muscle) or with hypertrophy (overgrowth of the muscle tissue).

2. Know the signs of a heart attack.

During a heart attack, men often have these symptoms:

i. Pain or discomfort in the Centre of the chest.

ii. Pain or discomfort in other areas of the upper body, including the arms, back, neck, jaw, or stomach.

iii. Other symptoms, such as shortness of breath breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, or light-headedness.

3. The basics of stroke.

Stroke is the third leading cause of death for men. The stroke occurs when part of the brain does not get the blood it needs. Then, brain cells die.

There are two types of stroke.

i. An ischemic (iss-kee-mik) stroke. This happens when blood is blocked from getting to the brain.

ii. A hemorrhagic (heh-muh-ra-jik) stroke. This happens when a blood vessel in the brain bursts and blood bleeds into the brain.

A person might also have a “mini-stroke.” This happens when, for a short time, less blood than normal gets to the brain. You may have some signs of a full stroke, or you may not notice any signs at all. But it only lasts a few minutes up to 24 hours. Then you’re back to normal. Many people don’t even know they’ve had it. However, a “mini-stroke” is a sign of a full stroke to come, so it’s important to know the signs of a stroke.

4. Know the signs of Stroke.

The signs of a stroke happen suddenly and are different from the signs of a heart attack. Look for these signs:

i. Weakness or numbness on one side of your body.
ii. Dizziness
iii. loss of balance
iv. Confusion
v. Trouble talking or understanding speech
vi. A headache
vii. Nausea
viii. Trouble walking or seeing.

Remember: Even if you have a “mini-stroke” you may have some of these signs.

5. 12 Steps to a healthy heart;

i. Do not smoke: It is no surprise that smoking hurts your heart. So if you smoke, try to quit.

ii. Get your cholesterol tested: If it is high (above 200), talk to your doctor or nurse about losing weight (if you are overweight) and getting more active. Ask if there is the medicine that may help.

iii. Know your blood pressure: Your heart moves blood through your body. If it is hard for your heart to do this, your heart works harder and your blood pressure will rise. Have it checked to make sure you’re on track! It is high (systolic above 139 and diastolic above 89), talk to your doctor or nurse about how to lower it.

iv. Get tested for diabetes: Diabetes can raise your chances of getting heart disease. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar levels in check! This is the best way for you to take care of yourself and your heart.

v. Eat heart-healthy foods: Whole grain foods, vegetables, and fruits. Choose lean meats and low-fat cheese and dairy products. Limit foods that have lots of saturated fat, like butter, whole milk, baked goods, ice cream, fatty meats and cheese.

vi. Keep a healthy weight: Being overweight or obese raises your risk for heart disease.

vii. Eat less salt: Choose foods salt. Use spices, herbs, lemon, and lime instead of salt. This is really important if you have high blood pressure.

viii. Do not drink too much of alcohol: Too much alcohol raises blood pressure and can raise your risk of stroke and other problems.

ix. Get moving: Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most days, if not all days of the week.

x. Take your medicine: If your doctor has prescribed medicine to lower your blood pressure or cholesterol, take it exactly as you have been told to take it.

xi. Take steps to treat your sleep problems: If you snore loudly, have been told you stop breathing at times when you sleep and are very sleepy during the day, you may have sleep apnea. If you don’t treat it, it raises your chances of having a heart attack or stroke. Talk with your doctor or nurse about treating this problem.

xii. Find healthy ways to cope with stress: Sometimes, people cope with stress by eating, drinking too much alcohol, or smoking-these are all ways that could hurt your heart. Lower your stress: talk to friends, be physically active, or meditate.